Article review
Zen Tale

The power of hindsight​

Let’s review an old tale today?

A farmer and his son had a beloved stallion who helped the family earn a living. One day, the horse ran away, and their neighbors exclaimed, “Your horse ran away, what terrible luck!” The farmer replied, “Maybe so, maybe not. We’ll see.”

A few days later, the horse returned home, leading a few wild mares back to the farm as well. The neighbors shouted out, “Your horse has returned, and brought several horses home with him. What great luck!” The farmer replied, “Maybe so, maybe not. We’ll see.”

A few days later, the horse returned home, leading a few wild mares back to the farm as well. The neighbors shouted out, “Your horse has returned, and brought several horses home with him. What great luck!” The farmer replied, “Maybe so, maybe not. We’ll see.”

Later that week, the farmer’s son was trying to break one of the mares, and she threw him to the ground, breaking his leg. The villagers cried, “Your son broke his leg, what terrible luck!” The farmer replied, “Maybe so, maybe not. We’ll see.”

A few weeks later, soldiers from the national army marched through town, recruiting all the able-bodied boys for the army. They did not take the farmer’s son, still recovering from his injury. Friends shouted, “Your boy is spared, what tremendous luck!” To which the farmer replied, “Maybe so, maybe not. We’ll see.”

So… Everybody talks about the power of insights: having a spark of a new idea that allows you to change your whole perspective on a subject.

Zen Tale
Maybe so, maybe not. 😉
Illustration co-created with @andresidarta

But what I want to talk about today is the power of hindsight.

What can we take from the story? No event can indeed be judged as good or bad, lucky or unlucky, fortunate or unfortunate. Only time will tell the whole story. And be prepared for its meaning to change several times.

Even if you are in a really augmented process of change, things might go unnoticed.

The hard part of standing on an exponential curve is:when you look backwards, it looks flat,and when you look forward, it looks vertical.

Sam Altman

Or maybe seem bad when they are, in fact, good.

My inspiration to write about this came from this post. We talked about Marie’s work before this week, but her initiative of “Decade in review” really got my attention and was worth sharing.

So, the challenge is to take the year review to the next level and review your last 10 years! What I like about this approach is that several things that make no sense if you analyze them after a short period of time can gain a whole new color when we look after some time.

Also, sometimes we just forget, and consequently, we don’t value ours conquers enough.

People overestimate what can be done in one year, and underestimate what can be done in ten.

Joseph Licklider

Try this out. What have you learned / accomplished these last 10 years? Why these things matter to you? How can you make the next 10 years even better?

Author : Fernanda Sarmento

Fernanda Sarmento is the owner of @mindingwithin, a self-development addicted, writer and digital marketer. With a bachelor in Social Communication and Media Studies and a master in Production Engineering she regards herself as both a meditation and ice cream junkie.

2 thoughts on “The power of hindsight​

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *